Kristin L. Moilanen, Ph.D.


Visiting Senior Research Specialist, University of Illinois at Chicago; Editor in Chief, Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology

Helicopter Parenting and Adjustment Outcomes in Young Adulthood: A Consideration of the Mediating Roles of Mastery and Self-Regulation


Journal article


Kristin L Moilanen, Mary Lynn Manuel
Journal of Child and Family Studies, 2019

Semantic Scholar DOI
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APA
Moilanen, K. L., & Manuel, M. L. (2019). Helicopter Parenting and Adjustment Outcomes in Young Adulthood: A Consideration of the Mediating Roles of Mastery and Self-Regulation. Journal of Child and Family Studies.

Chicago/Turabian
Moilanen, Kristin L, and Mary Lynn Manuel. “Helicopter Parenting and Adjustment Outcomes in Young Adulthood: A Consideration of the Mediating Roles of Mastery and Self-Regulation.” Journal of Child and Family Studies (2019).

MLA
Moilanen, Kristin L., and Mary Lynn Manuel. “Helicopter Parenting and Adjustment Outcomes in Young Adulthood: A Consideration of the Mediating Roles of Mastery and Self-Regulation.” Journal of Child and Family Studies, 2019.


Abstract

ObjectivesThe present study considered whether helicopter parenting in emerging adulthood is linked to adjustment outcomes (i.e., social competence, prosocial behavior, depression, substance use, and lifetime criminality) above and beyond other parenting practices (i.e., acceptance, psychological and firm control), and whether any associations are mediated by personal mastery and/or self-regulation.MethodsYoung adults ages 18 to 24 years responded to anonymous internet surveys (N= 302; 64.9% female, 79.4% white, 9.1% Hispanic).ResultsHigh helicopter parenting was linked to low mastery, self-regulation, and social competence, and to high depression. Only associations with depression were attenuated when other parenting practices were controlled. Direct effects of helicopter parenting on depression and social competence were mitigated to non-significance when self-regulation and/or mastery were modeled. Helicopter parenting and parental acceptance had indirect effects on all forms of adjustment via self-regulation, as well as indirect effects via mastery for depression.ConclusionsCollectively, the findings suggest that helicopter parenting has comparatively stronger impacts for socio-emotional versus behavioral adjustment, operating indirectly via self-regulation versus mastery.


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